Revisiting Agrawal et al. 1999

In a paper published in Nature in 1999, Anurag Agrawal, Christian Laforsch and Ralph Tollrian showed that when Daphnia and and wild radish were exposed, non-lethall to their respective they produced offspring that were better defended than those from unattacked organisms. This study was one of the first to find strong evidence, in both plants … Continue reading Revisiting Agrawal et al. 1999

Revisiting Harrison et al. 1988

In a paper published in The American Naturalist in 1988, Susan Harrison, Dennis Murphy and Paul Ehrlich demonstrate the existence of a metapopulation of the Bay checkerspot butterfly, a rare species whose larvae feed on plants that grow on patches of serpentine soil. Using a combination of field surveys, simulation modelling and historical information, Harrison … Continue reading Revisiting Harrison et al. 1988

Revisiting Bascompte et al. 2003

In a paper published in PNAS in 2003, Jordi Bascompte, Pedro Jordano, Carlos Meli├ín and Jens Olesen investigated the structural organisation of 52 mutualistic networks and found them to be highly nested, resulting in communities centred around a smaller core of interactions. Bascompte and colleagues also found that communities that contained a greater number of … Continue reading Revisiting Bascompte et al. 2003

Revisiting Ebert 1994

In a paper published in Science in 1994, Dieter Ebert showed, using laboratory experiments on a horizontally-transmitted disease in Daphnia, that spore production and infection was lower when the geographic distance between parasite and wild-caught Daphnia host origins were greater. Ebert's findings suggested that parasites were locally adapted and contradicted the hypothesis that co-evolved parasites … Continue reading Revisiting Ebert 1994