Revisiting Pauly et al. 1998

In a paper published in Science in 1998, Daniel Pauly, Villy Christensen, Johanne Dalsgaard, Rainer Froese and Francisco Torres Jr., using the Food and Agriculture Organisation's (FAO's) global fisheries catch data, showed that the mean trophic level had declined over the period of 1950 to 1994. In other words, fisheries, over this period, was moving … Continue reading Revisiting Pauly et al. 1998

Revisiting Şekercioğlu et al. 2002

In a paper published in PNAS in 2002, Çağan Şekercioğlu, Paul Ehrlich, Gretchen Daily, Deniz Aygen, David Goehring and Randi Sandi showed. using data from forest fragments in Costa Rica, that the ability to move through the deforested matrix was the best predictor of persistence of understory insectivorous birds in small forest fragments. Bird diets, … Continue reading Revisiting Şekercioğlu et al. 2002

Revisiting Likens et al. 1970

In a study published in Ecological Monographs in 1970, Gene Likens, F. Herbert Bormann, Noye Johnson, Don Fisher and Robert Pierce compared nutrient budgets between a control forested catchment and a catchment that was deforested and regrowth prevented for two years through the application of herbicide. Likens and colleagues demonstrated that this manipulation caused changes … Continue reading Revisiting Likens et al. 1970

Revisiting Ostrom & Nagendra 2006

In a paper published in PNAS in 2006, Elinor Ostrom and Harini Nagendra synthesized the findings of a long-term research program aimed at understanding how institutional factors affect forests managed under different kinds of tenure. Bringing together satellite images, socio-ecological studies in the field, and laboratory experiments of human behaviour, Ostrom and Nagendra showed that … Continue reading Revisiting Ostrom & Nagendra 2006

Revisiting Stachowicz et al. 1999

In a paper published in Science in 1999, Jay Stachowicz, Robert Whitlach and Richard Osman showed, using experimental communities of sessile marine invertebrates that invasion success was lower in more species rich communities. The like reason for this pattern was that space, which was the limiting resource in the system, was more fully and efficiently … Continue reading Revisiting Stachowicz et al. 1999

Revisiting Carvalho & Vasconcelos 1999

In a paper published in Biological Conservation in 1999, Karine Carvalho and Heraldo Vasconcelos examined the effects of forest fragmentation on litter-dwelling ants in Central Amazonia. Their results suggested that litter ant communities were structured both by edge and isolation effects in these fragments. Twenty-one years after the paper was published, I asked Karine Carvalho … Continue reading Revisiting Carvalho & Vasconcelos 1999

Revisiting Coulson et al. 2001

In a paper published in Science in 2001, Tim Coulson, Edward Catchpole, Steve Albon, Byron Morgan, Josephine Pemberton, Tim Clutton-Brock, Mick Crawley, and Bryan Grenfell examined the effect of density, climate and demography on population fluctuations in Soay sheep on the St. Kilda islands in the United Kingdom. Coulson and colleagues' found that age and … Continue reading Revisiting Coulson et al. 2001

Revisiting Torchin et al. 2003

In a paper published in Nature in 2003, Mark Torchin, Kevin Lafferty, Andrew Dobson, Valerie McKenzie and Armand Kuris provided evidence to suggest that reduced parasite load in their introduced range might contribute to an exotic species' invasive success. Using data from 26 exotic species from a variety of taxa, Torchin and colleagues found that … Continue reading Revisiting Torchin et al. 2003

Revisiting Johnson 1993

In a paper published in Ecological Applications in 1993, Nancy Collins Johnson showed, experimentally, that fertilization of soil leads to the selection of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that are inferior mutualists. Johnson found that fertilization, both, alters the species composition of AM fungal communities and that big bluestem plants colonized with AM fungi and other … Continue reading Revisiting Johnson 1993