Revisiting Couzin et al. 2005

In a paper published in Nature in 2005, Iain Couzin, Jens Krause, Nigel Franks and Simon Levin modelled how information can pass between members of groups without signalling, and when members don't know which, if any, of the other members have information. Couzin and colleagues showed that a very small proportion of informed individuals can … Continue reading Revisiting Couzin et al. 2005

Revisiting Davies & Brooke 1988

In a paper published in Animal Behaviour in 1988, Nick Davies and Michael Brooke unraveled, using a mix of natural history observation and clever experiments, the nature of the interaction between the brood-parasitic common cuckoo and its host the reed warbler. Their experiments showed that many facets of the cuckoo's behaviour are likely to have … Continue reading Revisiting Davies & Brooke 1988

Revisiting Jiggins et al. 2001

In a paper published in Nature in 2001, Chris Jiggins, Russell Naisbit, Rebecca Coe and James Mallet showed that divergence in mimicry of colour pattern was responsible for the origin of two Heliconia butterfly species. Using experiments, Jiggins and colleagues showed that differences in mimicry pattenrs led to assortative mating of the sister species and … Continue reading Revisiting Jiggins et al. 2001

Revisiting Dingemanse et al. 2002

In a paper published in Animal Behaviour in 2002, Niels Dingemanse, Christiaan Both, Piet Drent, Kees van Oers and Arie van Noordwijk showed, using an open field test in the laboratory on wild caught great tits, that, 1. there is consistent individual variation in behaviour, and 2. this behaviour is heritable. Fourteen years after the … Continue reading Revisiting Dingemanse et al. 2002

Revisiting Schmitz et al. 1997

In a paper published in Ecology in 1997, Oswald Schmitz, Andrew Beckerman and Kathleen O'Brien experimentally tested the relative importance of direct and indirect effects of predation in causing tropic cascades, Using an old-field system that included herbaceous plants, a herbivorous grasshopper and a spider predator, Schmitz and colleagues showed that indirect effects of predation, … Continue reading Revisiting Schmitz et al. 1997

Revisiting Inouye 1978

In a paper published in Ecology in 1978, David Inouye demonstrated, using removal experiments and careful observation in Gothic, Colorado, that the use of resources by a bumblebee species is affected by the presence of other bumblebee species , a finding that suggested that competitive exclusion occurs in these species. Thirty-nine years after the paper … Continue reading Revisiting Inouye 1978

Revisiting Bshary & Grutter 2006

In a paper published in Nature in 2006, Redouan Bshary and Alexandra Grutter provided experimental evidence for, both, image scoring by clients and increased cooperation by cleaners in the presence of image-scoring clients in a cleaner fish mutualism, suggesting that the mutualism is a case of indirect reciprocity. Ten years after the paper was published, … Continue reading Revisiting Bshary & Grutter 2006

Revisiting Bond and Kamil 2002

In a paper published in Nature in 2002, Alan Bond and Alan Kamil showed, with experiments using real jays and digital moths, that frequency-dependent predation led to the evolution of greater crypticity and phenotypic variation. Fourteen years after the paper was published I spoke to Alan Bond about how he got interested in studying effects … Continue reading Revisiting Bond and Kamil 2002

Revisiting Kirkpatrick 1982

In a paper published in Evolution in 1982, Mark Kirkpatrick showed, theoretically, that strong female mating preference for a male trait that reduces viability is neither selected for or against, but the mating advantage it provides to the males it prefers can lead to maintenance of that male trait in the population. Thirty-four years after … Continue reading Revisiting Kirkpatrick 1982

Revisiting Clutton-Brock and Albon 1979

In a paper published in Behaviour in 1979, Tim Clutton-Brock and Steve Albon showed, using observations and playback experiments, that red deer stags use roaring contests to assess each other's fighting abilities when there aren't any obvious size discrepancies. Twenty-seven years after the paper was published, I spoke to Tim Clutton-Brock (with inputs from Steve … Continue reading Revisiting Clutton-Brock and Albon 1979